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      From Political Activism to Democratic Change in the Arab World

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      This conference focuses on empowering political activism in the Arab world, and features scholars and activists discussing the achievements of and challenges facing political activists in Egypt, Tunisia, Yemen, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, and Saudi Arabia.

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      Second and Third Generation Right in Africa

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      In Africa like in the rest of the world, societies have sought to define the concept of human dignity through rules that define the qualities and the inherent value of the human person and his/her relationship with society.  In doing this several rules either by custom, tradition or formal law have defined the individual’s social obligations and duties to society.  They have also set up social hierarchy based on birth or sex and through the idea of submission to the will of sovereign or divine forces.  The rules or traditions or formal law also tended to stress the overriding importance soc

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      Environmental Humanities - Finding a future for climate change

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      The Program on Human Rights Collaboratory Series is an interdisciplinary investigation of human rights in the humanities. It is funded under the Stanford Presidential Fund for Innovation in International Studies as the third in a sequence of pursuing peace and security, improving governance and advancing well-being.

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      Cultural Heritage - The Role of Archaeology in Cultural Heritage and Human Rights

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      The Program on Human Rights Collaboratory Series is an interdisciplinary investigation of human rights in the humanities. It is funded under the Stanford Presidential Fund for Innovation in International Studies as the third in a sequence of pursuing peace and security, improving governance and advancing well-being.

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      The Nation Ex-Situ: On climate change, deterritorialized nationhood and the post-climate era

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      It is plausible that the impacts of climate change will render certain nation-states uninhabitable before the close of the century. While this may be the fate of a small number of those nation-states most vulnerable to climate change, its implications for the evoluation of statehood and international law in a "post-climate" regime is potentially seismic. Burkett argues that to respond to the phenomenon of landless nation-states, international law could accomodate an entierly new category ofinternational actors.

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      Before the law: Human and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      This workshop is part of the Program on Human Rights Collaboratory: Environmental Humanities Series, an interdisciplinary investigation of human rights in the humanities. The Series is funded under the Stanford Presidential Fund for Innovation in International Studies as the third in a sequence of pursuing peace and security, improving governance and advancing well-being.

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      Is Alien Tort Statute Applicable to Corporate Defendants?

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      Early in the Supreme Court oral arguments in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co., Justice Kennedy alerted the plaintiffs' lawyer that, for him, "the case turns on this:...

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      The Greek Economic and Political Crisis: What it Means for Europe

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      Ruby Gropas is a lecturer in international relations at the law faculty of the Democritus University of Thrace (Komotini) and research fellow at the Hellenic Foundation for European and Foreign Policy (ELIAMEP). Gropas was in residence at CDDRL in 2011 as a visiting scholar. In this seminar she will discuss the ongoing Greek economic and political crisis, and what it means for the future of the European Union and monetary system. Is the crisis in Greece ‘internal’ or is it symptomatic of a wider European failure?

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      Democratic Transition and Development in the Arab World

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      The third ARD annual conference examineي the challenges, key issues, and ways forward for social and economic development in the Arab world during this period of democratic transition.

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      "Why the Wind of Freedom Blows"

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      The graduating class at Stanford University has selected Larry Diamond as the 2012 Class Day speaker. A four-decade long tradition, the class day lecture is delivered by a well-liked Stanford faculty member who addresses the graduating class together with their friends and family, one last time. The class day lecture will be held on Saturday, June 16.

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      Turkey and the Arab Spring: Between Ethics and Self-Interest

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      Turkey redefined its geographical security environment over the last decade by deepening its engagement with neighboring regions, especially with the Middle East. The Arab spring, however, challenged not only the authoritarian regimes in the region but also Turkish foreign policy strategy. This strategy was based on cooperation with the existing regimes and did not prioritize the democracy promotion dimension of the issue. The upheavals in the Arab world, therefore, created a dilemma between ethics and self-interest in Turkish foreign policy.

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      Maritime Issues in East Asia: Finding Peaceful Solutions

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      Discussion of the current issues surrounding the sovereignty of the Diaoyutai Islets and the East China Sea peace initiative of the government of the Republic of China, Taiwan, through which ROC president Ma ying-jeou is calling for dialogue to resolve disputes over the archipelago.

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      Economic Reform and Democracy in the MENA Region: A Case study of CIPE's Projects in Egypt and Lebanon

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      The roots of the revolts known as the Arab Spring lie in many sources but one of the leading causes was the high rates of unemployment, low skill levels, and the growth of the youth populations. Now Arab governments are faced with the dual challenges of creating new political and economic systems that can meet the needs and demands of the peoples of their countries. This presentation will focus on the role of the private sector and the need to build an entrepreneurial eco-system that can foster rapid economic growth.

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      Violent Corruption and Violent Lobbying: Logics of Cartel-State Conflict in Mexico, Brazil and Colombia

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      Why have militarized crackdowns on drug cartels had wildly divergent outcomes, sometimes exacerbating cartel-state conflict, as in Mexico and, for decades, in Brazil, but sometimes reducing violence, as with Rio de Janeiro's new 'Pacification' (UPP) strategy?  CDDRL-CISAC Post Doctoral Fellow Benjamin Lessing will distinguish key logics of violence, focusing on violent corruption--cartels' use of coercive force in the negotiation of bribes.

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      Building Bridges: Towards Viable Democracies in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      The fourth annual conference of the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy (ARD) organized in collaboration with the University of Tunis, El Manar and the Centre d'études maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT), took place in Tunis on March 28 and 29, 2013. The conference theme 'Building Bridges: Towards Viable Democracies in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya' examines the cornerstones of democratic transition in those countries.

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      The Violence Trap: A Political-Economic Approach To the Problems of Development

      Commentary / July 9, 2013

      "The Violence Trap: A Political-Economic Approach to the Problems of Development" examines the problems of development – with a billion people mired in poverty and governments resistant to economic reform – economists and political scientists have proposed a wide range of development or poverty traps:  self-reinforcing mechanisms that prevent developing countries from embarking on the path of steady development. 

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      CDDRL honor student recognized for contributions to undergraduate education

      News / June 7, 2013
      Holly Fetter, an undergraduate senior honors student at the CDDRL received the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for her outstanding contributions to undergraduate education at Stanford University. Fetter will be presented with the Dinkelspiel Award on Sunday, June 16 at the Stanford Commencement ceremony.
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