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Giulia P. Davis
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To celebrate Black History Month and in support of this year's theme of "Black Resistance," the World House Project at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law is honored to share its award-winning short documentary, When I Get Grown: Reflections of a Freedom Rider, for free throughout the month of February.

When I Get Grown, a film based on World House Project director Dr. Clayborne Carson's interviews with American civil rights activist Bernard Lafayette, explores Lafayette's experiences as a Freedom Rider and his role in the Civil Rights Movement. The film highlights the Freedom Riders' commitment to end segregation and underscores the importance of black resistance in the struggle for equal rights and justice.

Bernard Lafayette's story is deeply intertwined with the theme of "Black Resistance," and his unwavering spirit of defiance against discrimination serves as a beacon of hope and inspiration for generations to come.

You can view the film's trailer below and watch it free online here.

 

AWARDS

 

  • Best Short Documentary (Harlem International Film Festival, 2022)
  • Best Short Documentary (Coronado Island Film Festival, 2022)
  • Audience Award, Best Documentary Short (Coronado Island Film Festival, 2022)
  • Henry Hampton Award for Excellence in Documentary Filmmaking (The Roxbury International Film Festival, 2022)
  • Most Inspiring — USA (The NewsFest — True Stories International Film and Writers Festival, 2022)
  • Best Documentary, 15-30 Minutes — Historical (The NewsFest — True Stories International Film and Writers Festival, 2022)
  • Best Trailer — Historical (The NewsFest — True Stories International Film and Writers Festival, 2022)
  • Best News Story — Historical (The NewsFest — True Stories International Film and Writers Festival, 2022)
  • Best Animation (The NewsFest — True Stories International Film and Writers Festival, 2022)

 

OFFICIAL SELECTIONS

 

  • Harlem International Film Festival (World Premiere), 2022
  • American Documentary and Animation Film Festival, 2022
  • United Nations Association Film Festival, 2022
  • Coronado Island Film Festival, 2022
  • Studio City International Film & TV Festival, 2022
  • Social Justice Film Festival, 2022
  • Sidewalk Film Festival, 2022
  • Montreal International Black Film Festival, 2022
  • Los Angeles Black Film Festival, 2022
  • New York City Independent Film Festival, 2022
  • Pan African Film Festival, 2022
  • American Documentary and Animation Film Festival, 2022
  • Roxbury International Film Festival, 2022
  • The NewsFest — True Stories International Film and Writers Festival, 2022
  • The World House Documentary Film Festival, 2023

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2023 World House Film Festival
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MLK Weekend Film Festival Explores "The Crisis of Democracy in the World House"

The World House Project's annual documentary film festival highlights the voices of marginalized communities and honors Martin Luther King Jr. and the movements he inspired.
MLK Weekend Film Festival Explores "The Crisis of Democracy in the World House"
Arrival at Schiphol of the pastor and civil rights activist Martin Luther King and his wife, on the occasion of receiving an honorary doctorate in social sciences from the VU University in Amsterdam
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Explore the Lives and Shared Legacy of Coretta Scott and Martin Luther King, Jr. with Clayborne Carson

Available through Stanford Continuing Studies, "Coretta Scott and Martin Luther King, Jr.: Their Lives and Shared Legacy" is a new online course that will run for four weeks on Tuesdays and Thursdays from January 17 through February 9, 2023. Enrollment is open now.
Explore the Lives and Shared Legacy of Coretta Scott and Martin Luther King, Jr. with Clayborne Carson
Staff of The World House Project on the stairs of Encina Hall
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The World House Project, Inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Vision of a More Just and Peaceful Future, Launches at FSI

Led by Clayborne Carson, the new project works to realize King's vision of the world as a large house in which "we must learn somehow to live with each other in peace.”
The World House Project, Inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Vision of a More Just and Peaceful Future, Launches at FSI
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“When I Get Grown: Reflections of a Freedom Rider,” a film based on Dr. Clayborne Carson's interviews with American civil rights activist Bernard Lafayette, is available to stream for free throughout the month of February.

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Giulia P. Davis
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To celebrate the 2023 Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday, The World House Project at CDDRL hosted a four-day virtual film festival from Friday, January 13, through Monday, January 16. The films and conversations focused on the theme of “The Crisis of Democracy in the World House.”

The 2023 World House Film Festival was a powerful showcase of thought-provoking documentaries, interviews, and discussions featuring Dr. Clayborne Carson and guest speakers, including filmmakers, peace activists, and artists. With over 1,600 registrants from 31 different countries, the event was a great international success and a true testament to the importance of highlighting the voices of marginalized communities and reviving the histories of the extraordinary women and men fighting for a more just society. This year, the festival also debuted a new section of African films that was highly acclaimed by attendees.

The festival was produced in partnership with Bullfrog filmsCalifornia Newsreel, the Camera as Witness Program (Stanford Arts)Clarity Films, the Kunhardt Film Foundation, the Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom CenterSilicon Valley African Film Festival, the USF Institute for Nonviolence and Social Justice, and the United Nations Film Festival, who graciously made 45 films and documentaries freely available over the course of the weekend. Trailers and information on how to watch the full films can be found on the festival website.

The World House Project is dedicated to realizing Martin Luther King Jr.'s vision of a peaceful World House in which "we have to live together," and the festival served as a powerful reminder of the importance of education, human rights, and nonviolence in achieving this goal.

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The World House Project's annual documentary film festival highlights the voices of marginalized communities and honors Martin Luther King Jr. and the movements he inspired.

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2023 World House Film Festival

A documentary film festival in celebration of the 2023 Martin Luther King, Jr., Holiday featuring films that explore "The Crisis of Democracy in the World House"


Join The World House Project for a free, four-day virtual film festival in celebration of the 2023 Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, beginning Friday evening, January 13, through Monday, January 16, 2023.

The virtual event will feature over 40 documentaries, as well as interviews and panel discussions with World House Project director Dr. Clayborne Carson and special guests that explore the theme of "The Crisis of Democracy in the World House."

For registration, film listings, and festival schedule, visit our website.

Virtual

Film Screenings
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Assistant Professor, Political Science
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Hakeem Jefferson is an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University where he is also a faculty affiliate with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Stanford Center for American Democracy. During the 2021-22 academic year he was also the SAGE Sara Miller McCune Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences.

Hakeem’s work focuses primarily on the role identity plays in structuring political attitudes and behaviors in the U.S. His in-progress book project builds on his award-winning dissertation to consider how Black Americans come to support punitive social policies that target members of their racial group.

In other projects, Hakeem examines the causes of the racial divide in Americans’ reactions to officer-involved shootings; works to evaluate the meaningfulness of key political concepts, like ideological identification among Black Americans; and considers how white Americans navigate an identity that many within the group perceive as increasingly stigmatized. In these and other projects, Hakeem sets out to showcase and clarify the important and complex ways that identity matters across all domains of American life.

A public-facing, justice-oriented scholar, Hakeem is an academic contributor at FiveThirtyEight and his writings and commentary have been featured in places like the New York Times, The Washington Post, NPR, and other major outlets. He is also active on Twitter, and you can follow him @hakeemjefferson.

CDDRL Affiliated Faculty
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Nora Sulots
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We are delighted to announce that Hakeem Jefferson, Assistant Professor of Political Science, is a new faculty affiliate at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law.

Professor Jefferson’s research focuses primarily on the role identity plays in structuring political attitudes and behaviors in the U.S. He is especially interested in understanding how stigma shapes the politics of Black Americans, particularly as it relates to group members’ support for racialized punitive social policies. In other research projects, he examines the psychological and social roots of the racial divide in Americans’ reactions to officer-involved shootings and works to evaluate the meaningfulness of key political concepts, like ideological identification, among Black Americans.

"I am delighted that Hakeem Jefferson is joining the CDDRL community” shared Kathryn Stoner, Mosbacher Director of CDDRL. “Hakeem's work on race and politics in America is a welcome addition to the Center's expanding work on the quality of American democracy. I look forward to supporting his important work on the role that identity plays in the United States and elsewhere in structuring political behavior and social policies."

Hakeem's work on race and politics in America is a welcome addition to the Center's expanding work on the quality of American democracy.
Kathryn Stoner
Mosbacher Director of CDDRL

Professor Jefferson is also a faculty affiliate with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Stanford Center for American Democracy. He received his PhD in political science from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and African American Studies from the University of South Carolina.

In 2020, his dissertation, "Policing Norms: Punishment and the Politics of Respectability Among Black Americans," was a co-winner of the Best Dissertation Award from the Political Psychology Section of the American Political Science Association.

Hakeem Jefferson

Hakeem Jefferson

Assistant Professor, Political Science and CDDRL Affiliated Faculty
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Jefferson, an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University, will join the center as a faculty affiliate.

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A documentary film festival featuring films speaking to Martin Luther King, Jr.'s vision of the World House


For the 2022 King Holiday, the World House Project will host a free, four-day webinar and virtual film festival, from the evening of January 14 through January 17, 2022. This virtual event will feature over 30 documentaries, musical performances, interviews, and panel discussions that speak to Dr. King's vision of the World House. 

The webinar will consist of daily Zoom meetings with the World House Project director Dr. Clayborne Carson who will speak with guests and webinar registrants on a range of topics, from the history of the civil rights movement to the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the African American freedom struggles.

The films and performances cover a variety of themes, from the history of the civil rights and anti-apartheid movements to James Baldwin and Martin Luther King's global visions. A full list of featured films and short descriptions will be available shortly.

The festival is produced in partnership with the Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom CenterCalifornia NewsreelClarity Films, the Camera as Witness Program (Stanford Arts), the Office for Religious & Spiritual Life at Stanford, and the Kunhardt Film Foundation.
 

Online via Zoom. Register Now

Film Screenings
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The REDI Task Force invites you to the next event in our Critical Conversations: Race in Global Affairs series; an exploration of colonialism and empire.

Capitalism and colonialism are often invoked in discussions in the social sciences and the humanities as the profound causes of racism, discrimination, human rights abuses, and the subaltern status of minority (and sometimes majority) groups in contemporary societies. These concepts are often useful more as a shorthand to describe deep historical processes. This panel seeks to elaborate on the specific mechanisms and accumulated social, political and economic events of colonialism that lead to particular outcomes of poverty, inequality or violence today. Comparative perspectives from history, political science and economics, from various regions of the world may advance our understanding of the deep forces that hinder racial equity, diversity, and inclusion.

About the Speakers:

Beatriz Magaloni is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science, FSI Senior Fellow, and affiliated faculty at the Center on Global Poverty and Development at Stanford University. She is the current Chair of the REDI Task Force.

Her first book, Voting for Autocracy: Hegemonic Party Survival and its Demise in Mexico (Cambridge University Press, 2006), won the Best Book Award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association and the 2007 Leon Epstein Award for the Best Book published in the previous two years in the area of political parties and organizations. Her second book, Strategies of Vote Buying: Democracy, Clientelism, and Poverty Relief in Mexico (co-authored with Alberto Diaz Cayeros and Federico Estévez), studies the politics of poverty relief. In 2010 she founded the Poverty, Violence and Governance Laboratory (POVGOV). The mission of  POVGOV is to develop action-oriented research through the elaboration of scientific knowledge that is anchored on state-of-the-art methodologies, multidisciplinary work, and innovative on-the-ground research and training. The Lab regularly incorporates undergraduate, masters, Ph.D. and post-doctoral students to pilot and evaluate interventions to reduce violence, combat human rights abuses and improve the accountability of law enforcement and justice systems.

Alberto Cayeros-Diaz joined the FSI faculty in 2013 after serving for five years as the director of the Center for US-Mexico studies at the University of California, San Diego. He earned his Ph.D at Duke University in 1997. He was an assistant professor of political science at Stanford from 2001-2008, before which he served as an assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Los Angeles. Diaz-Cayeros has also served as a researcher at Centro de Investigacion Para el Desarrollo, A.C. in Mexico from 1997-1999. His work has focused on federalism, poverty and violence in Latin America, and Mexico in particular. He has published widely in Spanish and English. His book Federalism, Fiscal Authority and Centralization in Latin America was published by Cambridge University Press in 2007 (reprinted 2016). His latest book (with Federico Estevez and Beatriz Magaloni) is: The Political Logic of Poverty Relief Electoral Strategies and Social Policy in Mexico. His work has primarily focused on federalism, poverty and economic reform in Latin America, and Mexico in particular, with more recent work addressing crime and violence, youth-at-risk, and police professionalization. 

Leonard Wantchekon is a Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University, as well as Associated Faculty in Economics. A scholar with diverse interests, Wantchekon has made substantive and methodological contributions to the fields of Political Economy, Economic History and Development Economics, and has also contributed significantly to the literatures on clientelism and state capture, resource curse and democratization. Wantchekon’s research includes groundbreaking studies on the long-term effects of historical events. For example, his paper “Slave Trade and the Origins of Mistrust in Africa” (AER, 2011, co-authored with Nathan Nunn) links current differences in trust levels within Africa to the transatlantic and Indian Ocean slave trade, and is widely regarded as one of the foundational papers in the emerging field of cultural economics. Similarly, his “Critical Junctures” paper (co-authored with Omar Garcia Ponce) finds that levels of democracy in post-Cold War Africa can be traced back to the nature of its anti-colonial independence movements. He is the Founder and President of the African School of Economics, which opened in Benin in 2014.

 

 

Online via Zoom

REGISTER

Encina Hall, C149
616 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford, CA 94305

(650) 725-0500
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Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science
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MA, PhD

Alberto Diaz-Cayeros joined the FSI faculty in 2013 after serving for five years as the director of the Center for US-Mexico studies at the University of California, San Diego. He earned his Ph.D at Duke University in 1997. He was an assistant professor of political science at Stanford from 2001-2008, before which he served as an assistant professor of political science at the University of California, Los Angeles. Diaz-Cayeros has also served as a researcher at Centro de Investigacion Para el Desarrollo, A.C. in Mexico from 1997-1999. His work has focused on federalism, poverty and violence in Latin America, and Mexico in particular. He has published widely in Spanish and English. His book Federalism, Fiscal Authority and Centralization in Latin America was published by Cambridge University Press in 2007 (reprinted 2016). His latest book (with Federico Estevez and Beatriz Magaloni) is: The Political Logic of Poverty Relief Electoral Strategies and Social Policy in Mexico. His work has primarily focused on federalism, poverty and economic reform in Latin America, and Mexico in particular, with more recent work addressing crime and violence, youth-at-risk, and police professionalization. 

Director of the Center for Latin American Studies
Affiliated faculty at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law
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Alberto Díaz-Cayeros FSI Senior Fellow Panelist CDDRL
Leonard Wantchekon Professor of Politics and International Affairs Panelist Princeton University

Dept. of Political Science
Encina Hall, Room 436
Stanford University,
Stanford, CA

(650) 724-5949
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Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations
Professor of Political Science
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MA, PhD

Beatriz Magaloni is the Graham H. Stuart Professor of International Relations, a Professor in the Department of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), and affiliated faculty at the Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law, the Center for Global Ethnography, and the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development. 

Her first book, Voting for Autocracy: Hegemonic Party Survival and its Demise in Mexico (Cambridge University Press, 2006), won the Best Book Award from the Comparative Democratization Section of the American Political Science Association and the 2007 Leon Epstein Award for the Best Book published in the previous two years in the area of political parties and organizations. Her second book, Strategies of Vote Buying: Democracy, Clientelism, and Poverty Relief in Mexico (co-authored with Alberto Diaz Cayeros and Federico Estévez), studies the politics of poverty relief. Why clientelism is such a prevalent form of electoral exchange, how it distorts policies aimed at aiding the poor, and when it can be superseded by more democratic and accountable forms of electoral exchange are some of the central questions that the book addresses.

In 2010 she founded the Poverty, Violence, and Governance Lab (POVGOV). There she pursues a research agenda focused on violence, human rights and poverty reduction. The mission of  POVGOV is to develop action-oriented research through the elaboration of scientific knowledge that is anchored on state-of-the-art methodologies, multidisciplinary work, and innovative on-the-ground research and training. The Lab regularly incorporates undergraduate, masters, Ph.D. and post-doctoral students to pilot and evaluate interventions to reduce violence, combat human rights abuses and improve the accountability of law enforcement and justice sytems.

Her work has appeared in the American Journal of Political Science, World Development, Comparative Political Studies, Annual Review of Political Science, Latin American Research Review, Journal of Theoretical Politics and other journals.

Prior to joining Stanford in 2001, Professor Magaloni was a visiting professor at UCLA and a professor of Political Science at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). She earned a Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University. She also holds a law degree from ITAM.

Affiliated faculty at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law and CISAC
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Beatriz Magaloni FSI Senior Fellow REDI Task Force Chair REDI
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When The Stars Begin to Fall book cover
About the Seminar: Structural racism threatens the principles that undergird the American creed. A national, multiracial solidarity is the best means of mitigating racism’s effects. The sociopolitical strategies of Black America – grounded in moral claims consonant with the creed but fashioned to be in alignment with contemporary national interests – provide a model for the type of solidarity the United States desperately needs.

This argument is explored in detail in When the Stars Begin to Fall: Overcoming Racism and Renewing the Promise of America. Through an examination of political science and sociological frameworks, alongside personal and historical narratives, it argues that structural racism is a crime of the state, that color-conscious policy is preferable to colorblindness, and that the American civil religion is central to national solidarity. Concluding with policy recommendations, the book offers the next step forward on the intractable issue of racism.
 

 

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Theodore R. Johnson
About the Speaker: Theodore R. Johnson is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Fellows Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law, where he undertakes research on race, politics, and American identity. Prior to joining the Brennan Center, he was a National Fellow at New America and a Commander in the United States Navy, serving for twenty years in a variety of positions, including as a White House Fellow in the first Obama administration and as speechwriter to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. His work on race relations has appeared in prominent national publications across the political spectrum, including the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and National Review, among others.

 

In-person for Stanford Affiliates: Philippines Conference Room
Online: Zoom

Theodore R. Johnson Senior Fellow and Director, Fellows Program at the Brennan Center for Justice
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In his latest round of nominations, President Biden nominated FSI's MLK, Jr. Centennial Professor Emeritus Dr. Clayborne Carson to the Civil Rights Cold Case Review Board.

As noted in the nomination accouncement from the White House, Dr. Carson has devoted most of his professional life to the study of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the movements King inspired. Since receiving his doctorate from UCLA in 1975, Dr. Carson has taught at Stanford University, where he is Martin Luther King, Jr., Centennial Professor of History (Emeritus).

In 1985, the late Coretta Scott King invited Dr. Carson to direct a long-term project to edit and publish the authoritative edition of her late husband’s speeches, sermons, correspondence, publications, and unpublished writings. Under Carson’s direction, the King Papers Project has produced seven volumes of The Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. In 2005 Carson founded the Martin Luther King, Jr. Research and Education Institute to endow and expand the educational outreach of the King Papers Project.

I’m very fortunate to have lived during a period when I could make at least a small contribution to the Black Freedom Movement and then make a contribution to making sure that those who made larger contributions have gradually gotten their due.
Clayborne Carson
MLK, Jr. Centennial Professor Emeritus, FSI

Carson is mindful of the unique arc of his academic and personal life. "I grew up in Los Alamos, New Mexico where we were one of only three Black families. What I knew about Black America was mainly what I read in the newspapers. I read about these heroic figures like Martin Luther King Jr., Bob Moses, Diane Nash, and John Lewis, and I wanted to be like them. I went to the March on Washington as a nineteen-year-old and watched and listened to what these leaders were working to accomplish. One of the remarkable things about my life is that I've been able to meet and get to know so many of the people who spoke or performed at the march or were on the speaker's platform at the Lincoln Memorial."

Dr. Carson is currently completing his final year as the director of the King Institute, afterwhich he will continue his research and teaching at Stanford’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law of the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

As Carson looks towards the future, he's appreciative of the opportunities ahead. "I’m still excited about the idea of exploring little known aspects of African-American history, so that should be good preparation for studying largely forgotten 'cold cases,'" he says.

Dr. Clayborne Carson

Clayborne Carson

MLK, Jr. Centennial Professor Emeritus, FSI
Full Profile

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Welcoming Dr. Clayborne Carson to CDDRL

We are delighted to welcome Dr. Clayborne Carson as the Martin Luther King, Jr. Centennial Professor Emeritus at FSI.
Welcoming Dr. Clayborne Carson to CDDRL
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What Protests For Racial Justice Tell Us About U.S. Democracy

American democracy is facing its most serious challenge in decades, says Larry Diamond on the World Class Podcast. But there are signs of hope.
What Protests For Racial Justice Tell Us About U.S. Democracy
police brutality
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New Research from the Poverty, Violence, and Governance Lab Examines Police Brutality

For the last 10 years, a team of social scientists at the Poverty, Violence, and Governance (PovGov) lab at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) have been developing action-oriented research to support human rights and inform policy on the root causes and devastating consequences of violence.
New Research from the Poverty, Violence, and Governance Lab Examines Police Brutality
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In his new role on the Civil Rights Cold Case Review Board, Dr. Carson, a seminal scholar on the life and writing of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., will review dozens of unsolved and racially motivated murder cases from the civil rights era.

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