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Journal Articles

Reinventing Russia's Party of Power: "Unity" and the 1999 Duma Election

Michael A. McFaul, Timothy Colton
Post-Soviet Affairs, 2000 July 1, 2000

Two specialists on Russian politics chronicle the formation and early development of Unity, the latest version of the "party of power" in Russian politics. Unity's unexpected success in the election of the State Duma in December 1999 helped assure Vladimir Putin's subsequent election as president and gave him a reliable base of support within the Duma itself. The authors draw on extensive interviews with participants to outline the motivations behind the creation of Unity and the campaign strategy it pursued in the fall of 1999.

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Journal Articles

Globalization: Sources and Effects on National States and Societies

John Meyer
International Journal of Comparative Sociology, 2000 June 1, 2000

The world polity and cultural system are relatively stateless, but they legitimate strong nation-state identities as the dominant actors. This produces very strong tendencies for the adoption of common models of modernity, despite extraordinary differences in resources and local culture. Local distinctiveness is also legitimated, so long as it is not inconsistent with homogeneity on the main dimensions of stratification and identity.

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Policy Briefs

Party Formation and Non-Formation in Russia

Michael McFaul
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2000 May 1, 2000

A party system is an essential attribute of a democratic policy. No parties, no democracy. Despite the erosion of the influence of parties in old democracies and the difficulties of establishing new parties in new democracies, theorists still agree that parties and a party system are necessary evils for the functioning of representative government. In liberal democracies, parties perform several tasks. During elections, they provide voters with distinctive choices, be they ideological, social, or even ethnic.

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Journal Articles

International Law and International Relations: Together, Apart, Together

Stephen Krasner
Chicago Journal of International Law, 2000 April 1, 2000
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Journal Articles

Yeltsin's Legacy

Michael McFaul
The Wilson Quarterly, 2000 April 1, 2000

Days after staring down the August 1991 coup attempt, Russian President Boris Yeltsin boasted a 90 percent approval rating at home, adorned the cover of every international weekly in the world, and was christened a democratic hero by world leaders from Washington to Tokyo. When he suddenly resigned as president on December 31, 1999, Yeltsin enjoyed an eight percent approval rating at home (with a margin of error of plus or minus four percent). He probably had only two or three international calls to make.

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Journal Articles

Stock Market Liberalization, Economic Reform, and Emerging Market Equity Prices

Peter B. Henry, Peter B. Henry
Journal of Finance, 2000 April 1, 2000

A stock market liberalization is a decision by a country's government to allow

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Journal Articles

'Actors' of Modern Society, The: The Cultural Construction of Social Agency

John Meyer, Ronald L. Jepperson
Sociological Theory, 2000 March 1, 2000

Much social theory takes for granted the core conceit of modern culture, that modern actors - individuals, organizations, nation states - are autochthonous and natural entities, no longer really embedded in culture. Accordingly, while there is much abstract metatheory about 'actors' and their 'agency,' there is arguably little theory about the topic.

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Journal Articles

Russia's Stalled Democracy

Michael McFaul
The World and I, 2000 March 1, 2000

Russia today is an electoral democracy. Political leaders come to power through the ballot box. They are not appointed by the Central Committee of the Communist Party. They do not take office by seizing power through the use of force. Most elites in Russia and the vast majority of the Russian population now recognize elections as the only legitimate means to power. Leaders and parties that espouse authoritarian practices--be they fascists or neocommunists--have moved to the margins of Russia's political stage.

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Journal Articles

What Counts as History: A Cross-national and Longitudinal Study of University Curricula

David John Frank, Suk-Ying Wong, John Meyer, Francisco Ramirez
Comparative Education Review, 2000 February 1, 2000

Within the sociological and educational literatures, there is a dearth of comparative and longitudinal work on changes in university curricula. Systematic empirical studies are especially rare. This article addresses the gap with a study of university history curricula in many countries between 1985 and 1994.

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Books

Consolidating Democracy in South Korea

Larry Diamond, Byung-Kook Kim
Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2000 February 1, 2000

Since its inception in 1987, Korean democracy has been an arean of continual drama and baffling contradictions, periodic waves of societal mobilization and disenchantment; initial continuity in political leadership followed by the successive election to the presidency of two former opposition leaders and the arrest of two former heads of state; a constant stream of party renaming and realignments; an extended period of economic success and then a breathtaking economic collapse; and a persistent quest for political reform within a political culture focused not on institutions but on power an

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Working Papers

The United States and the Republic of China, 1949-1978: Suspicious Allies

Steven Goldstein
Shorenstein APARC, 2000 February 1, 2000

Published as part of the "America's Alliances with Japan and Korea in a Changing Northeast Asia" Research Project.

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Journal Articles

Debt Relief

Serkan Arslanalp, Peter Henry
Journal of Economic Perspectives, 2000 January 1, 2000

At the Gleneagles summit in July 2005, the heads of state from the G-8 countries - the United States, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia and the United Kingdom - called on the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the African Development Bank to cancel 100 percent of their debt claims on the world's poorest countries. The world's richest countries have agreed in principle to forgive roughly $55 billion dollars owed by the world's poorest nations.

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Journal Articles

Russia's 1999 Parliamentary Elections: Party Consolidation and Fragmentation

Michael McFaul
Demokratizatsiya, 2000 January 1, 2000

In the wake of Yeltsin's unexpected resignation on 31 December 1999 and the apparent inevitability of Putin's electoral victory in the March 2000 presidential election, the 1999 December parliamentary elections already seem like ancient history. For the analyst of Russian politics, however, Russia's Duma vote offers a new wealth of data that will help reveal important trends in electoral behavior, party development, and institutional consolidation.

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Journal Articles

Nobody Lost Russia

Michael McFaul
Blueprint, 2000 January 1, 2000

Is Russia lost? To read the barrage of op-ed articles, congressional testimony, and political position papers that have flowed from both the left and the right since last summer, one might have concluded that Russia is dead and gone - and the Clinton Administration is to blame. It is true that eight years after the fall of communism, Russia is riddled with corruption, its politics are unstable, and the structures of democracy and free markets have yet to strike deep roots. There is also a resurgent anti-Western element in Russian politics. But Russia is not lost.

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Journal Articles

Getting Russia Right

Michael A. McFaul
Foreign Policy, 2000 January 1, 2000

Historians will someday write that Russia re-entered the Western community of states as a market democracy at the end of the 20th century. You wouldn't think so, however, from the vituperative and pessimistic tone of most contemporary commentary in the United States about Russia and U.S.-Russian relations. Focusing on lurid accounts of Russian money laundering, cronyism, and widespread political and economic disarray, politicians and pundits have blasted the Clinton administration for mishandling a crucial strategic relationship and "losing" Russia.

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Journal Articles

Russia Democracy: Still Not a Lost Cause

Michael A. McFaul
The Washington Quarterly, 2000 January 1, 2000

In the recent explosion of articles about "Who Lost Russia," analysts have focused almost exclusively on the trials and tribulations of Russia's economic reform and Western attempts to assist these reforms. Russia's financial collapse in August 1998 and recent accusations of money laundering through the Bank of New York are cited as evidence that Russia is lost. The logic of this analysis is flawed. It assumes that these setbacks to economic reform or the rule of law represent end points in Russian history.

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