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Journal Articles

The Gender Dimensions of Foreign Influence Operations

Samantha Bradshaw, Amélie Henle
International Journal of Communication, 2021 October 31, 2021
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Journal Articles

Kathryn E. Stoner’s Russia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order and James Reilly’s Orchestration: China’s Economic Statecraft Across Asia and Europe

Marcin Kaczmarski, Robert Sutter, Alexander Korolev, Kathryn Stoner, James Reilly
Asia Policy, 2021 October 27, 2021
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Journal Articles

How Authoritarians Win When They Lose

Sultan Tepe, Ayça Alemdaroğlu
Journal of Democracy, 2021 October 19, 2021
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Journal Articles

Russia’s Road to Autocracy

Michael A. McFaul
Journal of Democracy, 2021 October 19, 2021
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Working Papers

Experimental Evidence on Semi-structured Bargaining with Private Information

Margherita Comola, Marcel Fafchamps
National Bureau of Economic Research, 2021 September 30, 2021
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Journal Articles

Expect the Unexpected When Learning the Scholar’s Craft

Kathryn Stoner
H-Diplo, 2021 September 28, 2021

Part of an essay series on Learning the Scholar’s Craft: Reflections of Historians and International Relations Scholars

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Working Papers

Altruism and the Topology of Transfer Networks

Marcel Fafchamps, Simon Heß
Centre for Economic Policy Research, 2021 September 15, 2021
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Commentary

Democracy and Autocracy, Volume 19(2), September 2021

Jean Lachapelle, Hesham Sallam, Amr Hamzawy, Toby Matthiesen, Ayça Alemdaroğlu, Gönül Tol, Lisa Blaydes, Benjamin Schuetze, Dana El Kurd
Democracy and Autocracy Organized Section of the American Political Science Association (APSA), 2021 September 13, 2021

September 2021 issue of the Democracy and Autocracy newsletter, dedicated to the theme "The International Aftermath of the Arab Spring."

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Books

System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot

Rob Reich, Mehran Sahami, Jeremy M. Weinstein
2021 September 7, 2021

A forward-thinking manifesto from three Stanford professors—experts who have worked at ground zero of the tech revolution for decades—which reveals how big tech’s obsession with optimization and efficiency has sacrificed fundamental human values and outlines steps we can take to change course, renew our democracy, and save ourselves.

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Commentary

The Collapse of Tunisia’s Party System and the Rise of Kais Saied

Nate Grubman, Aytuğ Şaşmaz
2021 August 17, 2021
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Working Papers

Pandemic Spikes and Broken Spears: Indigenous Resilience after the Conquest of Mexico

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Juan Espinosa-Balbuena, Saumitra Jha
Stanford GSB, 2021 August 9, 2021

It is well-established that the Conquest of the Americas by Europeans led to catastrophic declines in indigenous populations. However, less is known about the conditions under which indigenous communities were able to overcome the onslaught of disease and violence that they faced. Drawing upon a rich set of sources, including Aztec tribute rolls and early Conquest censuses (chiefly the Suma de Visita} (1548)), we develop a new disaggregated dataset on pre-Conquest economic, epidemiological and political conditions both in 11,888 potential settlement locations in the historic core of Mexico and in 1,093 actual Conquest-era city-settlements. Of these 1,093 settlements, we show that 36% had disappeared entirely by 1790. Yet, despite being subject to Conquest-era violence, subsequent coercion and multiple pandemics that led average populations in those settlements to fall from 2,377 to 128 by 1646, 13% would still end the colonial era larger than they started. We show that both indigenous settlement survival durations and population levels through the colonial period are robustly predicted, not just by Spanish settler choices or by their diseases, but also by the extent to which indigenous communities could themselves leverage non-replicable and non-expropriable resources and skills from the pre-Hispanic period that would prove complementary to global trade. Thus indigenous opportunities and agency played important roles in shaping their own resilience.

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Conference Memos

POMEPS Studies 43: Digital Activism and Authoritarian Adaptation in the Middle East

Larry Diamond, Eileen Donahoe, Shelby Grossman, Renée DiResta, Josh A. Goldstein
2021 August 5, 2021

The Project on Middle East Political Science partnered with Stanford University’s Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law and its Global Digital Policy Incubator for an innovative two week online seminar to explore the issues surrounding digital activism and authoritarianism. This workshop was built upon more than a decade of our collaboration on issues related to the internet and politics in the Middle East, beginning in 2011 with a series of workshops in the “Blogs and Bullets” project supported by the United States Institute for Peace and the PeaceTech Lab. This new collaboration brought together more than a dozen scholars and practitioners with deep experience in digital policy and activism, some focused on the Middle East and others offering a global and comparative perspective. POMEPS STUDIES 43 collects essays from that workshop, shaped by two weeks of public and private discussion.

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Journal Articles

The Future of Platform Power: Solving for a Moving Target

Francis Fukuyama
Journal of Democracy, 2021 July 1, 2021

This essay is a part of an exchange based on Francis Fukuyama’s “Making the Internet Safe for Democracy” from the April 2021 issue of the Journal of Democracy.

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Journal Articles

Anonymity or Distance? Job Search and Labour Market Exclusion in a Growing African City

Girum Abebe, Stefano Caria, Marcel Fafchamps, Paolo Falco, Simon Franklin, Simon Quinn
The Review of Economic Studies, 2021 May 21, 2021
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Journal Articles

The evolution of built-up areas in Ghana since 1975

Marcel Fafchamps, Forhad Shilpi
PLoS one, 2021 May 21, 2021

We use high resolution satellite data on the proportion of buildings in a 250x250 meter cell to study the evolution of human settlement in Ghana over a 40 year period. We find a strong increase in built-up area over time, mostly concentrated in the vicinity of roads, and also directly on the coast. We find strong evidence of agglomeration effects both in the static sense—buildup in one cell predicts buildup in a nearby cell—and in a dynamic sense—buildup in a cell predicts buildup in that cell later on and an increase in buildup in nearby cells. These effects are strongest over a 3 to 15 Km radius, which corresponds to a natural hinterland for a population without mechanized transportation. We find no evidence that human settlements are spaced more or less equally either over the landscape or along roads. This suggests that arable land is not yet fully utilized, allowing rural settlements to be separated by areas of un-farmed land. By fitting a transition matrix to the data, we predict a sharp increase in the proportion of the country that is densely built-up by the middle and the end of the century, but no increase in the proportion of partially built-up locations.

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Journal Articles

Making the Internet Safe for Democracy

Francis Fukuyama
Journal of Democracy, 2021 April 1, 2021

The power of large internet platforms to amplify or silence certain voices at a scale that can alter major political outcomes poses a grave threat to democracy.

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Working Papers

Government Quality and State Capacity: Survey Results from Brazil

Ana Karine Pereira, Raphael Amorim Machado, Pedro Luiz Costa Cavalcante, Alexandra de Avile Gomide, Amanda Gomes Magalhaes, Isabella de Araujo Goellner, Roberto Rocha Coelho Pires, Katherine Bersch, Alan Ricardo da Silva
2021 February 23, 2021
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Working Papers

Trading Stocks Builds Financial Confidence and Compresses the Gender Gap

Saumitra Jha, Moses Shayo
Stanford GSB, 2021 February 10, 2021

Many studies document low rates of financial literacy and suboptimal levels of participation in financial markets. These issues are particularly acute among women. Does this reflect a self-reinforcing trap? If so, can a nudge to participate in financial markets generate knowledge, confidence, and further increase informed participation? We conduct a large field experiment that enables and incentivizes working-age men and women---a challenging group to reach with standard financial training programs---to trade stocks for four to seven weeks. We provide no additional educational content. We find that trading significantly improves financial confidence, as reflected in stock market participation, objective and subjective measures of financial knowledge, and risk tolerance. These effects are especially strong among women. Participants also become more self-reliant and consult others less when making financial decisions.

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Journal Articles

Governing youth in times of dissent: essay competitions, politics of history, and emotions

Ayça Alemdaroğlu
Turkish Studies, 2021 February 2, 2021

This article examines the AKP’s youth politics in the aftermath of the 2013 Gezi Protests. It focuses on a seemingly mundane cultural practice of essay writing and student essay competitions to investigate the party’s message and methods in addressing young people. In particular, it examines the politics of history and emotional politics in the party's effort to construct and administer youth publics. The article argues that the AKP’s power is embedded in and reproduced by the articulation of political differences and mobilization of emotions, which play a significant role in the party’s broader bid to reorganize society, redefine collective identity, and control dissent.

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Books

Russia Resurrected: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order

Kathryn Stoner
2021 February 1, 2021

An assessment of Russia that suggests that we should look beyond traditional means of power to understand its strength and capacity to disrupt international politics.

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Journal Articles

Lancet Series on Women’s and Children’s Health in Conflict Settings

Paul H. Wise, Eran Bendavid, Stephen J. Stedman
2021 January 24, 2021

A new four-paper series in The Lancet exposes the far-reaching effects of modern warfare on women’s and children’s health.

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