CDDRL Publications

Publications

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Book

Joshua Cohen
Oxford University Press, 2010

In famously beautiful and laconic prose, Jean- Jacques Rousseau presents us a forceful picture of a democratic society, in which we live together as free and equal, and our politics focuses on the common good. In Rousseau: Free Community of Equals Joshua Cohen explains how the values of freedom, equality, and community all work together as parts of the democratic ideal expressed in Rousseau's conception of the ‘society of the general will'.

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Book

Lina Khatib
Spaces of Security and Insecurity: Geographies of the War on Terror, ed. Alan Ingram and Klaus Dodds, 2010
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Journal Article

Beatriz Magaloni, Ruth Kricheli
Annual Review of Political Science, 2010
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Commentary

2010

Welcome back to Stanford! Our quarterly newsletter has taken on this new two-page format which we hope you will enjoy. This issue gives you a brief look at the year ahead as well as describing key aspects of our inaugural 2009-2010 events and activities.

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Working Paper

Jordan Gans-Morse, Sebastian Mazzuca, Simeon Nichter
CDDRL Working Papers, 2010

Clientelist parties (or political machines) engage in a variety of strategies during elections. Most studies focus exclusively on "vote buying," a strategy that rewards opposing voters for switching their vote choices. Yet in many countries, machines also adopt other strategies, such as activating their passive constituencies through "turnout buying." What factors explain variation in patterns of clientelism during elections? We develop an analytical framework and formal model that emphasize the role of individual and contextual factors.

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Journal Article

Hicham Ben Abdallah
Le Monde Diplomatique, 2010
An Abstract

All too frequently, students of democracy and democratization view the politics they analyze exclusively through the prism of constitutions, elections, and political actors. In the case of the Middle East, this involves worn out questions of religious fundamentalism, neo-colonialism, entrenched autocracy, the politics of oil and Israel, etc. While all of these are indeed relevant to understanding the perseverance of authoritarian political structures, it is equally crucial to understand the dynamics of culture, and the ways in which forms of cultural

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Working Paper

Jakob Tolstrup
CDDRL Working Papers, 2010

This paper put forward a theoretical explanation of when and to what degree external actors matter in democratization.

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Journal Article

Sumit Ganguly, Paul Kapur
The Washington Quarterly, 2010

Throughout its history, Pakistan has deliberately used non-state actors as a strategy of asymmetric warfare against stronger adversaries such as India and the Soviet Union. Islamist militants were armed and trained by elements of the Pakistani military and intelligence services, and funded by a sophisticated international financial network. This enabled Pakistan to attrite Indian and Soviet resources via proxy, without having to face either country in a direct conflict.

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Journal Article

Larry Diamond
Journal of Democracy, 2010

(excerpt) During democratization’s “third wave,” democracy ceased being a mostly Western phenomenon and “went global.” When the third wave began in 1974, the world had only about 40 democracies, and only a few of them lay outside the West. By the time the Journal of Democracy be- gan publishing in 1990, there were 76 electoral democracies (accounting for slightly less than half the world’s independent states). By 1995, that number had shot up to 117—three in every five states.

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