Francis Fukuyama

DEMOCRACY WORLD

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Identity and the End of History

In this podcast, Francis Fukuyama addresses the relationship between his latest book "Identity" and his book "The End of History," where he points out the fact that he has been writing about identity consistently over the years, beginning with his 1992 book "The End of History and The Last Man."

Social Media Mixdown

The idea that the big internet platforms are not media companies has never really been tenable, and the contradictions in their public protestations of neutrality have become ever more apparent over time.

Facebook vs. Democracy

Francis Fukuyama in conversation with Frederic Filloux (Monday Note)on the latest development regarding social network platforms and democracy. Transcript included.

"Public policy education needs to shift its focus from training policy analysts to training leaders who are capable of actually implementing good policies. In our experimentation both at my Center’s Leadership Academy for Development and in the new Stanford Masters in International Policy, case teaching has become an integral part of the approach."

Francis Fukuyama: Future of Russia - U.S. Relations

For "Democracy World" Elizaveta Osetinskaya, Stanford alumna (Russia, '16) and the founder of the media startup "The Bell", interviewed CDDRL Mosbacher Director Francis Fukuyama about the U.S. - Russia relations, discussing possible outcomes. They also talked about democracy around the world, populism and identity.

What is populism and how did it happen to us?

Francis Fukuyama, Stanford CDDRL Mosbacher Director, gives an overview of populism as a phenomenon and puts it in context with a current political situation in U.S. and around the world.

End Of History Revisited Part 1

There is a core of the concept that I still think remains valid, though we are clearly living in a different phase of global politics than when the original article was written. It would be strange if the passage of almost thirty years did not change the way I thought about the world. It’s nonetheless important to distinguish between reasonable critiques and ones that are silly or based on simple misunderstandings.