CDDRL's current pre- and postdoctoral fellows

Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) is proud to announce the incoming fellows who will be joining us in the 2019-2020 academic year to develop their research, engage with faculty and tap into our diverse scholarly community.
 
The pre- and postdoctoral program will provide fellows the time to focus on research and data analysis as they work to finalize and publish their dissertation research while connecting with resident faculty and research staff at CDDRL. 
 
Fellows will present their research during our weekly research seminar series and an array of scholarly events and conferences.
 
Learn more in the Q&A below.

    CDDRL's pre- and postdoctoral fellows 2019-20
  • CDDRL's pre- and postdoctoral fellows 2019-20
  • Christopher Carothers, CDDRL Postdoctoral Fellow, 2019-20
  • Laura Jakli, CDDRL Pre-Doctoral Fellow, 2019-20
  • Tesalia Rizzo, CDDRL Postdoctoral Scholar, 2019-20
  • Luis Rodriguez, CDDRL Pre-doctoral Fellow 2019-20
  • Zhu Zhang, CDDRL Pre-Doctoral Fellow, 2019-20

CDDRL's pre- and postdoctoral fellows 2019-20

Christopher Carothers, CDDRL Postdoctoral Fellow, 2019-20

Hometown: Bethesda, MD
 
Academic Institution: Harvard University
 
Discipline and degree conferral date (or expected): Government, May 2019
 
Research Interests: Authoritarianism, corruption, East Asia, comparative politics
 
Dissertation Title: Combating Corruption in Authoritarian Regimes
 
What attracted you to the CDDRL Pre/post-doctoral program? I was attracted by the opportunity to work with and learn from the remarkable scholars at CDDRL, at FSI, and in the broader Stanford community. I’m excited that this program brings together scholars with diverse substantive and regional expertise to advance our knowledge about critically important political, economic, and legal issues around the world.
 
What do you hope to accomplish during your nine-month residency at the CDDRL? Primarily, I hope to revise my dissertation into a book manuscript. I also hope to advance other projects on issues of authoritarianism, corruption, and East Asian political development, as well as to collaborate on new ideas with scholars at Stanford.
 
Fun fact: I have more friends in real life than on social media.

Laura Jakli, CDDRL Pre-Doctoral Fellow, 2019-20

Hometown: Budapest, Hungary

Academic Institution: University of California, Berkeley
 
Discipline and degree conferral date (or expected): Political Science (expected 2020)
 
Short list of Research Interests: Democratic decline, Digital politics, Populism, Migration
 
Dissertation Title: Engineering Extremism: How Digital Platforms Radicalize Politics
 
What attracted you to the CDDRL Pre/post-doctoral program? The Center’s intellectual
community is comprised of world-renowned scholars researching global populism and
examining the ways in which digital technology shapes democracy. Having the opportunity to
workshop my research in this community is invaluable.
 
What do you hope to accomplish during your nine-month residency at the CDDRL? I plan to write up the dissertation and finish some remaining experimental analysis. I also hope to collaborate on research with other CDDRL fellows and faculty. 
 
Fun fact: I have never written a to-do list.

Tesalia Rizzo, CDDRL Postdoctoral Scholar, 2019-20

Hometown: Monterrey, Mexico

Academic Institution: MIT
 
Discipline and degree conferral date (or expected): Summer 2019
 
Short list of Research Interests: Political Economy of Development, Comparative Political Behavior, Intermediaries, Bureaucracy, Clientelism, Accountability, Survey and
Experimental Methodology.
 
Dissertation Title: Clients or Citizens?: The Bureaucratic Costs of Claim-Making in Mexico
 
What attracted you to the CDDRL Pre/post-doctoral program? The amazing intellectual
richness and interdisciplinarity of the group of scholars at CDDRL. I am excited to discuss policy relevant research and engage diverse theoretical perspectives on democracy and development.
 
What do you hope to accomplish during your nine-month residency at the CDDRL? A book manuscript! In my book, I argue that bureaucratic transaction costs often make it unfeasibly difficult for individuals to pursue welfare benefits directly. Instead, these costs make individuals dependent on clientelist intermediaries, who demand political favors in return for access.
Mediated avenues of distribution prevent individuals from learning to navigate the bureaucracy and experience its processes and thus to see themselves as citizens with rights and entitlements. As a result, instead of strengthening political engagement and citizenship, the pursuit of social welfare benefits tends to intensify ties of dependency and obligation to political parties and their local intermediaries—a process I term the clientelist feedback loop.
 
Fun fact: By the time I was 13, I knew the lyrics of all Beatles songs, including bootlegs and rarities. For me, singing Revolver on repeat was crucial in mastering spoken English (and in learning about oppressive taxation).

Luis Rodriguez, CDDRL Pre-doctoral Fellow 2019-20

Hometown: San Juan, Puerto Rico
 
Academic Institution: Stanford University (Ph.D.)
 
Discipline and degree conferral date (or expected): Political Science (expected 2020)
 
Short list of Research Interests: My dissertation examines the variation in behaviors in organized crime groups in Latin America and the ways in which drug trafficking organizations weaken state
capacity. I also have developed an interest in understanding how police violence becomes established as an institutional norm and how it can be curbed.
 
Dissertation Title: Crime and Impunity: Organized Crime and State Capacity in Latin America
What attracted you to the CDDRL Pre/post-doctoral program? I'd already been around CDDRL,
serving as a Teaching Assistant for Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law and working
at the Poverty, Violence, and Governance Lab and so have a deep appreciation for the intellectual environment and breadth of perspectives at the Center.
 
What do you hope to accomplish during your nine-month residency at the CDDRL? I’m hoping that in addition to finishing my dissertation which examines the determinants of organized crime behavior, I’ll be able to develop lines of research on the determinants of police violence and criminal investigation as well as a series of projects I’ve begun at the Poverty, Violence, and
Governance Lab at CDDRL.
 
Fun fact: I can cook a decent paella, which is a meal I've been trying for years to convince family and friends to use as a replacement for the turkey as the centerpiece at Thanksgiving.

Zhu Zhang, CDDRL Pre-Doctoral Fellow, 2019-20

Hometown: Shanghai, China
 
Academic Institution: Tulane University
 
Discipline and degree conferral date (or expected): Political Science, Expected June 2020
 
Short list of Research Interests: Chinese Politics, Authoritarianism, State-Business Relations, Research
Methodology
 
Dissertation Title: Wealth without Power: The Rise of Chinese Private Business Elites and Their Relationship to the Communist Party
 
What attracted you to the CDDRL Pre/post-doctoral program? The Center’s pre-doctoral
program is the most ideal setting to join because of the unique interdisciplinary design of the
program, the composition of the world-renowned scholars, the quality of the faculty research
and teaching, and the outstanding resources. I aspire to be a part of the program because of the tremendous opportunities to learn, discuss, and initiate new ideas with colleagues from all over the world.
 
What do you hope to accomplish during your nine-month residency at the CDDRL? During my residency at CDDRL, I plan to complete my dissertation and prepare one empirical chapter of the dissertation for publication in an academic journal. I also hope to complete the data
collection and documentation for the Chinese billionaire network dataset and make that data available to the academic community.
 
Fun fact: I can’t live without chili sauce.

 

CDDRL Pre-doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowship Program