Jeremy M. Weinstein

Jeremey Weinstein

Jeremy M. Weinstein, PhD

  • Kleinheinz Family Professor of International Studies
  • Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
  • Professor of Political Science
  • Affiliated faculty at the Center for International Security and Cooperation

Department of Political Science
Stanford University
Encina Hall West, 415
Stanford, CA 94305-6044

(650) 736-1224 (voice)

Biography

Jeremy Weinstein is Professor of Political Science, Fisher Family Director of Stanford Global Studies, and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. He also is faculty co-director of the Immigration Policy Lab and the Data for Development Initiative. In addition, he is a non-resident fellow at the Center for Global Development in Washington, D.C.

His research focuses on civil wars and political violence; ethnic politics and the political economy of development; and democracy, accountability, and political change. He is the author of Inside Rebellion: The Politics of Insurgent Violence (Cambridge University Press), which received the William Riker Prize for the best book on political economy. He is also the co-author of Coethnicity: Diversity and the Dilemmas of Collective Action (Russell Sage Foundation), which received the Gregory Luebbert Award for the best book in comparative politics, and System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot (HarperCollins, 2021). He has published articles in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Annual Review of Political Science, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Journal of Democracy, World Policy Journal, and the SAIS Review.

Weinstein received the International Studies Association’s Karl Deutsch Award in 2013. The award is given to a scholar younger than 40 or within 10 years of earning a Ph.D. who has made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He also received the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching at Stanford in 2007.

He has also worked at the highest levels of government on major foreign policy and national security challenges, engaging in both global diplomacy and national policy-making. Between 2013 and 2015, Weinstein served as the Deputy to the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and, before that, as the Chief of Staff at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations. As Deputy, Weinstein was a standing member of the National Security Council Deputies’ Committee – the sub-cabinet policy committee with primary responsibility for advising the National Security Council, the Cabinet, and the President on the full range of foreign policy issues, including global counterterrorism, nonproliferation, U.S. policy in the Middle East, the strategic rebalance to Asia, cyber threats, among a wide variety of other issues.

During President Obama’s first term, he served as Director for Development and Democracy on the National Security Council staff at the White House between 2009 and 2011. In this capacity, he played a key role in the National Security Council’s work on global development, democracy and human rights, and anti-corruption, with a global portfolio. Before joining the White House staff, Weinstein served as an advisor to the Obama campaign and, during the transition, as a member of the National Security Policy Working Group and the Foreign Assistance Agency Review Team.

Weinstein obtained a BA with high honors from Swarthmore College, and an MA and PhD in political economy and government from Harvard University. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on a number of nonprofit boards and advisory groups.

publications

Conference Memos
January 2023

How Technology Changed the Game on Democratic Development

Author(s)
cover link How Technology Changed the Game on Democratic Development
Journal Articles
December 2021

Community policing does not build citizen trust in police or reduce crime in the Global South

Author(s)
cover link Community policing does not build citizen trust in police or reduce crime in the Global South
Books
September 2021

System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot

Author(s)
cover link System Error: Where Big Tech Went Wrong and How We Can Reboot

In The News

In an earlier iteration of the course, Professor Jeremy Weinstein lectured to students via Zoom in an experimental multi-screen format. Copyright and credit: Bob Smith, MSME, ’82
News

An invitation back to the classroom: Stanford course for working professionals centers ethics in discussions of technology

In its fourth year, "Ethics, Tech + Public Policy for Practitioners," taught by Rob Reich, Mehran Sahami, and Jeremy M. Weinstein, experiments with setting up long-term communities of professionals interested in responsible tech governance.
cover link An invitation back to the classroom: Stanford course for working professionals centers ethics in discussions of technology
Jeremy Weinstein is the faculty director of the BA in Data Science and Social Systems and a professor of political science. Mallory Nobles, right, is the program’s associate director.
News

How Stanford is preparing the next generation of data scientists

The gateway course for the new Data Science & Social Systems major teaches students how data can be used to address important social problems.
cover link How Stanford is preparing the next generation of data scientists
A law enforcement officer meets with community members in Brazil.
Q&As

Community Policing: A Better Way to Improve Policing or a Bust?

A first-of-its-kind study from Jeremy M. Weinstein, Graeme Blair and Fotini Christia shows that the celebrated practice of community policing may have few, if any, positive impacts on communities in the Global South.
cover link Community Policing: A Better Way to Improve Policing or a Bust?