Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. Looking more broadly at these issues, FSI’s Governance Project works on measuring the quality of governance and assessing a country’s ability to deliver public services.

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. One project explores how authoritarian and democratic regimes can encourage or suppress economic development. Meanwhile, the European Governance project looks at governance issues on a single continent.

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Recent Events

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Russian Propaganda about Syria

December 5, 2019

Co-author Renée DiResta Abstract:When protests against Syrian President Bashar Assad began in 2011, Russia made good on its decades-long alliance with Syria, providing Assad with diplomatic and...

When Bandits Settle

November 21, 2019

Abstract: Different criminal groups organize differently – crucially, some make attempts to restrain violence on the part of their agents while others engage in unrestrained bloody campaigns.

Comparing Immigration Policies in the US, Canada, and Australia

November 14, 2019

Speaker Bio:Francis Fukuyama is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), the Director of the Ford Dorsey Master's in International Policy...

The Costs of Claim-Making in Mexico

November 7, 2019

Abstract:High bureaucratic transaction costs can make it impossible for individuals to claim welfare benefits.

Of Chickens and Eggs: Does Growth Require Market-Enhancing Institutions?

October 31, 2019

Abstract:Scholars and policymakers maintain that economic growth requires strong legal institutions that can ensure competitive markets.

The global spread of political polarization

October 24, 2019

Abstract:Political polarization is tearing at the seams of democracies around the world—from Brazil, India, and Kenya, to Poland, Turkey, and the United States.

State Capture in China?

October 17, 2019

Abstract:The dynamic game between political and business elites in both democratic and non-democratic countries has received much attention since the rise of the super-rich in global politics.

Ill Winds Against Liberal Democracy

October 10, 2019

Speaker Bio:Larry Diamond is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Contingent Extremism

September 26, 2019

Abstract:What explains the political momentum of far right parties?

Egypt’s Exiles: Repression, Polarization and Politics

September 9, 2019

ABSTRACTWhile the phenomenon of Egyptians leaving their homeland in search for work abroad has been ongoing for decades, a new trend has emerged since 2011, namely thousands have expatriated for...

The Struggle for Political Change in the Arab World

September 9, 2019

DAY 1: Friday October 11 8:30 – 9:00am         Breakfast 9:00 – 9:15am         Introductory Remarks 9:15 – 11:15am       Panel 1: The Boundaries of Authoritarianism post-Arab UprisingsAmr Hamzawy,...

Tunisia's Vital Election: Democratic Consolidation in a Divided Society

September 9, 2019

ABSTRACTThis lecture will consider the challenge of moving from a negotiated transition to a consolidated democracy as exemplified by the case critical of Tunisia.

Should We Take Authoritarian Anti-Corruption Seriously?

September 3, 2019

Abstract:Anti-corruption efforts by authoritarian regimes are often assumed to be political charades or excuses to purge rivals.

CDDRL Seminar Featuring Honor Student Awardees

June 5, 2019

Two CDDRL honors students will present their theses at this week's CDDRL Research Seminar on Wednesday, June 5, from 12-1:30pm.    Sophia Pink's thesis, "Think like a Scientist: Interventions to...

Elusive inclusion – South Africa’s continuing struggle

May 30, 2019

Abstract:Efforts are underway in South Africa to turn around a decade of governance reversal.

How to Save a Constitutional Democracy

May 23, 2019

Abstract:Democracies are in danger. Around the world, a rising wave of populist leaders threatens to erode the core structures of democratic self rule.

Ill Winds: Book Launch and Discussion with Larry Diamond

May 20, 2019

Please join Larry Diamond, Senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Affairs and the Hoover Institution for the launch of his latest book, "Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from...

Memory and Forgetting in Autocracies

May 16, 2019

Abstract: How do memory and forgetting shape politics in autocracies?

Cosmopolitanism and the Crisis of Social Identity

May 9, 2019

Abstract:The recent surge in nationalism and tribalism brings renewed salience to questions of identity within and across borders.

Measuring Governance Cross-Nationally

May 7, 2019

CLOSED WORKSHOPSince 2012, the Governance Project at CDDRL has sought to develop better comparative measures of state quality.

Social Voting in Semi-Authoritarian Systems

May 7, 2019

Abstract:In dominant-party states, why do individuals vote in elections with foregone conclusions when they are neither bought nor coerced?

Can Nationalism Be A Resource for Democracy? Lessons From Asia

May 2, 2019

Abstract: Inequality has long been widely and rightly seen as one of the greatest threats to democracy.

The Polarization of Nationalist Cleavages and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

April 25, 2019

Abstract:Using survey data from a variety of sources, I examine how multiple conceptions of American nationhood shaped respondents’ voting preferences in the 2016 U.S.

Algerian Uprisings Past and Present

April 23, 2019

This event is co-sponsored with The Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies.  Abstract:Since February 22 2019, Algerians have taken to the streets in massive numbers to call for an end to a protean...

People

Gustavo Robles Research Scholar, CDDRL
Eileen Donahoe Lecturer, CDDRL
Erik Jensen Senior Research Scholar, CDDRL Professor of the Practice, Law
Jeremy M. Weinstein Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Lisa Blaydes Senior Fellow Associate Professor, Political Science
Jenny Martinez Senior Fellow, by courtesy Professor, Law
Hesham Sallam Research Scholar, CDDRL Associate Director and Research Associate, Program on Arab Reform and Democracy
Jerry Kaplan Lecturer, CDDRL, Research Affiliate, CDDRL
James D. Fearon Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Stephen D. Krasner Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science, Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution
Alberto Díaz-Cayeros Senior Fellow Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
Abbas Milani Adjunct Professor Research Fellow, Hoover Institution