Security

Security

FSI scholars produce research aimed at creating a safer world and examing the consequences of security policies on institutions and society. They look at longstanding issues including nuclear nonproliferation and the conflicts between countries like North and South Korea. But their research also examines new and emerging areas that transcend traditional borders – the drug war in Mexico and expanding terrorism networks. FSI researchers look at the changing methods of warfare with a focus on biosecurity and nuclear risk. They tackle cybersecurity with an eye toward privacy concerns and explore the implications of new actors like hackers.

Along with the changing face of conflict, terrorism and crime, FSI researchers study food security. They tackle the global problems of hunger, poverty and environmental degradation by generating knowledge and policy-relevant solutions. 

Recent Scholarly Publications

Records 5 / 5

How the Mexican Drug War Affects Kids and Schools? Evidence on Effects and Mechanisms

October 2016

In this paper published by the International Journal of Educational Development, we investigate the impact of drug-related violence in Mexico on academic achievement.

How the Mexican Drug War Affects Kids and Schools? Evidence on Effects and Mechanisms

June 2016

In this paper published by the International Journal of Educational Development, we investigate the impact of drug-related violence in Mexico on academic achievement.

The Economic Costs of Drug-Trafficking Violence in Mexico

December 2013

The levels of violence in Mexico have dramatically increased in the last few years due to structural changes in the drug trafficking business.

The Mexican War on Drugs: Crime and the Limits of Government Persuasion

October 2013

Abstract:In order to successfully battle organized crime, governments require a certain degree of citizens’ support.

How do Crime and Violence Impact Presidential Approval? Examining the Dynamics of the Mexican Case

October 2013

Abstract:In order to effectively fight criminal organizations, governments require support from significant segments of society.

People

Beatriz Magaloni Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Edgar Franco Vivanco Doctoral Candidate, Political Science
Stephanie Gimenez Stahlberg Research Assistant, CDDRL