International Development

International Development

FSI researchers consider international development from a variety of angles. They analyze ideas such as how public action and good governance are cornerstones of economic prosperity in Mexico and how investments in high school education will improve China’s economy.

They are looking at novel technological interventions to improve rural livelihoods, like the development implications of solar power-generated crop growing in Northern Benin.

FSI academics also assess which political processes yield better access to public services, particularly in developing countries. With a focus on health care, researchers have studied the political incentives to embrace UNICEF’s child survival efforts and how a well-run anti-alcohol policy in Russia affected mortality rates.

FSI’s work on international development also includes training the next generation of leaders through pre- and post-doctoral fellowships as well as the Draper Hills Summer Fellows Program.

Recent Projects

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Improving Teacher Quality in Mexico

Teaching is a core element of the educational process and a significant body of literature demonstrates that good teachers matter a lot for improving student academic achievement.
English

Economic Consequences of Violence

The Poverty and Governance Program has an ongoing research agenda aiming to evaluate the impact of drug-related violence on economic activity.
English

The Incidence of Criminal Activity Near Schools in Mexico

The consequences of organized crime related violence for education are tragic.
English

The Use of Lethal Force by the Police in Rio de Janeiro and the Pacification Process

The Military Police of the State of Rio de Janeiro (PMERJ) confront critical challenges as they attempt to reform and reduce the incidence of the use of lethal force.
English

Clientelism and Distortion of Anti-Poverty Policies

One of the greatest challenges for development is to sort out political incentives that adversely affect poverty-relief targeting.
English

Traditional Governance, Citizen Engagement and Local Public Goods: Evidence from Mexico

In developing countries authority is often wielded unevenly. Tribes, clans, religious groups and other traditional leaders control zones of governance outside of the reach of the state.
English

People

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros Senior Fellow Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
Beatriz Magaloni Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
Edgar Franco Vivanco Doctoral Candidate, Political Science
Stephanie Gimenez Stahlberg Research Assistant, CDDRL
Belinda Byrne Program Manager, CDDRL