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Books

Classless Politics

Hesham Sallam
2022 October 25, 2022

Islamist Movements, the Left, and Authoritarian Legacies in Egypt

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Books

Struggles for Political Change in the Arab World

Lisa Blaydes, Amr Hamzawy, Hesham Sallam
2022 October 11, 2022

Regimes, Oppositions, and External Actors after the Spring

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Journal Articles

Labor conflict within foreign, domestic, and Chinese-owned manufacturing firms in Ethiopia

Marcel Fafchamps, James Chu
World Development, 2022 August 14, 2022

A large firm survey shows that labor conflicts in Ethiopia are more frequent in foreign-owned firms, especially those that are Chinese-owned. Foreign firms hire similarly educated and experienced workers, while offering similar salaries and benefits. We draw on case studies to explore reasons why foreign, and especially Chinese-owned firms, face exceptional levels of labor conflict. Misaligned perceptions about the role of local labor laws may be an important driver of conflict.

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Books

The Law of Democracy, Legal Structure of the Political Process

Samuel Issacharoff, Pamela S. Karlan, Pamela S. Karlan, Nathaniel Persily, Franita Tolson
2022 August 3, 2022

This book created the field of the law of democracy, offering a systematic account of the legal construction of American democracy. This edition represents a significant revision that reflects the embattled state of democracy in the U.S. and abroad.

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Working Papers

Risk Pooling and Precautionary Saving in Village Economies

Marcel Fafchamps, Aditya Shrinivas
National Bureau of Economic Research, 2022 June 14, 2022

A new method to test for efficient risk pooling allows for intertemporal smoothing, non-homothetic consumption, and heterogeneous risk and time preferences.

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Working Papers

Frameworks for a Developmental Welfare State: Lessons From Pakistan's Ehsaas Programme

Sir Michael Barber, Muqueet Shahzad
CDDRL Working Papers, 2022 June 6, 2022
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Journal Articles

The Long-Run Consequences of The Opium Concessions for Out-Group Animosity on Java

Nicholas Kuipers
World Politics, 2022 May 25, 2022

This article examines the consequences of the opium concession system in the Dutch East Indies—a nineteenth-century institution through which the Dutch would auction the monopolistic right to sell opium in a given locality.

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Working Papers

Keep it Simple: A Field Experiment on Information Sharing Among Strangers

Catia Batista, Marcel Fafchamps, Pedro C. Vicente
IZA Discussion Paper, 2022 May 19, 2022
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Journal Articles

The obsolescing bargain crosses the Belt and Road Initiative: renegotiations on BRI projects

Michael Bennon, Francis Fukuyama
Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 2022 May 18, 2022

A study examining the BRI through the lens of the obsolescing bargain to evaluate the practices of China’s state-owned enterprises (SOEs) and policy banks in mitigating political risk.

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Journal Articles

Driving while unauthorized: Auto insurance remains unchanged when providing driver licenses to unauthorized immigrants in California

Hans Lueders, Micah Mumper
Journal of Risk and Insurance, 2022 May 12, 2022

What is the effect of offering driver's licenses to undocumented people? Hans Lueders and Micah Mumper offer answers.

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Books

Liberalism and Its Discontents

Francis Fukuyama
2022 May 10, 2022

A short book about the challenges to liberalism from the right and the left by the bestselling author of The Origins of Political Order.

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Working Papers

Valuing the Time of the Self-Employed

Daniel J. Agness, Travis Baseler, Sylvain Chassang, Pascaline Dupas, Erik Snowberg
2022 February 22, 2022

Pascaline Dupas and co-authors Agness, Baseler, Chassang, and Snowberg leverage individual choice data they generate on farmers in western Kenya to solve a general problem: do behavioral phenomena drive individual choices when trading off cash for time, or cash and time for goods?

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Journal Articles

Pandemic Spikes and Broken Spears: Indigenous Resilience after the Conquest of Mexico

Alberto Díaz-Cayeros, Juan Espinosa-Balbuena, Saumitra Jha
Journal of Historical Political Economy, 2022 February 21, 2022

In a new paper for the Journal of Historical Political Economy, Alberto Diaz-Cayeros and Saumitra Jha examine the conditions under which indigenous communities in Mexico were able to overcome the onslaught of disease and violence that they faced.

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Journal Articles

Displacing fishmeal with protein derived from stranded methane

Sahar H. El Abbadi, Evan D. Sherwin, Adam R. Brandt, Stephen P. Luby, Craig S. Criddle
Nature Sustainability, 2022 January 25, 2022

Stanford researchers reveal how to turn a global warming liability into a profitable food security solution

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Journal Articles

Democracy's Arc: From Resurgent to Imperiled

Larry Diamond
Journal of Democracy, 2022 January 17, 2022

In his final essay as co-editor of the Journal of Democracy, Larry Diamond calls this moment the darkest for freedom in a half-century. Whether democracy regains its footing will depend on how democratic leaders and citizens respond to emboldened authoritarians and divisions within their own societies.

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Journal Articles

Transition Arrested

Nate Grubman
Journal of Democracy, 2022 January 17, 2022

Nate Grubman shows how the repeated failures of Tunisia’s once-promising democratic transition created a crisis ripe for exploitation by a populist outsider

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Journal Articles

How Voters Respond to Presidential Assaults on Checks and Balances: Evidence from a Survey Experiment in Turkey

Aytuğ Şaşmaz, Alper H. Yagci, Daniel Ziblatt
Comparative Political Studies, 2022 January 13, 2022

Why do voters support executive aggrandizement?

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Journal Articles

Towards a unified approach to research on democratic backsliding

Haemin Jee, Hans Lueders, Rachel Myrick
Democratization, 2021 December 9, 2021

A growing literature examines democratic backsliding, but there is little consensus on when, where, and why it occurs.

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Journal Articles

Community policing does not build citizen trust in police or reduce crime in the Global South

Graeme Blair, Jeremy M. Weinstein, Fotini Christia
Science, 2021 December 1, 2021

Is it possible to reduce crime without exacerbating adversarial relationships between police and citizens? Community policing is a celebrated reform with that aim, which is now adopted on six continents. However, the evidence base is limited, studying reform components in isolation in a limited set of countries, and remaining largely silent on citizen-police trust. We designed six field experiments with Global South police agencies to study locally designed models of community policing using coordinated measures of crime and the attitudes and behaviors of citizens and police. In a preregistered meta-analysis, we found that these interventions led to mixed implementation, largely failed to improve citizen-police relations, and did not reduce crime. Societies may need to implement structural changes first for incremental police reforms such as community policing to succeed.

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Journal Articles

When no bad deed goes punished: Relational contracting in Ghana and the UK

Elwyn Davies, Marcel Fafchamps
Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, 2021 November 30, 2021
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Working Papers

Markets under Siege: How Differences in Political Beliefs can move Financial Markets

Saumitra Jha, Peter Koudijs
2021 November 18, 2021

Can differences in beliefs about politics, particularly the benefits of war and peace, move markets? During the Siege of Paris by the Prussian army (1870-71) and its aftermath, we document that the price of the French 3% sovereign bond (rente) differed persistently between the Bourse in Paris and elsewhere, despite being one of the most widely held and actively traded financial assets in continental Europe. Further, these differences were large, reaching the equivalent of almost 1% of French GDP in overall value. We show these differences manifested themselves during the period of limited arbitrage induced by the Siege and persisted until the terms of peace were revealed. As long as French military resistance continued, the rente price was higher in Paris than the outside markets, but when the parties ceased fire and started negotiating peace terms this pattern was reversed. Further, while the price responded more to war events in Paris, the price responded more to peace events elsewhere. These specific patterns are difficult to reconcile with other potential mechanisms, including differential information sets, need for liquidity, or relative market thickness. Instead, we argue, these results are consistent with prices reflecting the updating of different prevailing political beliefs that existed in Paris and elsewhere about the benefits of war and peace.

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Working Papers

The Impact of Community Masking on COVID-19: A Cluster-Randomized Trial in Bangladesh

Stephen P. Luby, et al
Innovations for Poverty Action, 2021 November 8, 2021

A randomized trial of community-level mask promotion in rural Bangladesh during COVID-19 shows that the intervention increased mask-use and reduced symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections.

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Journal Articles

Transitional Justice As Communication: Why Truth Commissions and International Criminal Tribunals Need to Persuade and Inform Citizens and Leaders, and How They Can

Jamie O'Connell
South Carolina Law Review, 2021 November 2, 2021

This Article reframes transitional justice as communication. It argues that the impact of truth and reconciliation commissions (TRCs) and international criminal tribunals (ICTs) on countries where human rights violations occurred depends largely on these institutions changing what those countries’ citizens and elites know and believe. More precisely: most of the ways TRCs and ICTs could advance their goals—such as reconciliation and deterrence—require informing these domestic audiences about the institutions’ activities, methods, and findings, and persuading them to accept the institutions’ conclusions. Communication-specific activities, such as public outreach and media relations, are essential. Yet shaping elite and popular knowledge and opinion are not mere add-ons to what some see as TRCs’ and ICTs’ “core” work: investigating human rights violations, holding hearings, writing reports, and indicting and trying perpetrators. Rather, the imperative of influencing local people must shape how these institutions conduct those activities and sometimes even what conclusions they reach. Unfortunately, TRC commissioners, ICT judges and prosecutors, and their staff, along with transitional justice scholars, have underestimated the importance of influencing domestic audiences for advancing TRCs’ and ICTs’ goals. As a result, the institutions have devoted too little attention and resources to communication.

The Article also provides a typology of the activities and occasions through which TRCs and ICTs can influence domestic audiences. It offers examples of effective and ineffective practice from five international criminal tribunals, such as the International Criminal Court and Special Court for Sierra Leone, and over a dozen truth commissions, such as South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Where evidence permits, it assesses individual institutions’ performance. Finally, the Article analyzes the most important challenges that TRCs and ICTs encounter in communicating with domestic audiences.

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Journal Articles

Is Deliberation an Antidote to Extreme Partisan Polarization? Reflections on “America in One Room”

James Fishkin, Alice Siu, Larry Diamond, Norman Bradburn
American Political Science Review, 2021 November 1, 2021

This paper stands at the intersection of two literatures—on partisan polarization and on democratic deliberation—that have not had much connection with one another. If readers find some of the results surprising, the authors have had the same reaction. In this paper we describe these results and our approach to explaining them.

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