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Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. 

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. 

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Scholarly Publications

Caught in the Crossfire: The Geography of Extortion and Police Corruption in Mexico [Feb. 2015]

February 2015

When Mexican President Felipe Caldrón took office in December 2006 he declared a war on the nation’s drug traffic organizations (Ríos and Shirk, 2011).

Living in Fear: The Dynamics of Extortion in Mexico's Criminal Insurgency [Feb. 2015]

February 2015

This paper provides an account of the strategies of extortion and co-optation used by drug trafficking organizations (DTOs) toward civil society in Mexico.

Other Publications

Conference Report: Violence and Policing in Latin American and U.S. Cities [April 2014]

January 2015

The global cities of Latin America - Rio de Janeiro, Ciudad Juarez, Tijuana, Mexico City and Medellin - have become engines of economic growth.

La Geografía Electoral de 2012 (México)

October 2012

On July 1, over 50 million Mexicans went to the polls to elect the next President of the Republic.

News

Press Release: Will body-worn cameras curb police violence?

December 2015

This month Stanford researchers are in one of the largest slums – or favelas – in Latin America to launch the first-of-its kind comprehensive study on the use of body-worn cameras by the military...

With a new president and an old party, Mexico faces uncertain future

July 2012

Enrique Peña Nieto was elected Mexico's president promising to curb the country's drug-related violence.

Cuéllar, Magaloni on Iranian assassination plot and link to Mexican cartels

October 2011

As if the alleged Iranian plan to kill Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the U.S.

Events

Educational and Entrepreneurial Initiatives to Support Youth in Places of Violence

April 28, 2015

CONFERENCE OVERVIEWThe heavy presence of youth and young adults in the world of criminality is an issue that has been gaining increasingly more attention in the agendas of policymakers and...

Crime, Violence and Governance in Latin America: Sharing Data and Building a Web-Based Research Network to Expand Knowledge

June 7, 2013

Despite some interesting research on crime and violence in Latin American countries (particularly Colombia), there is still a relative dearth of policy-oriented research.

The Economic Consequences of Drug Trafficking Violence in Mexico

April 11, 2013

Abstract: The levels of violence in Mexico have dramatically increased in the last few years due to structural changes in the drug trafficking business.

People

Alberto Diaz-Cayeros Headshot Alberto Díaz-Cayeros Senior Fellow Professor, by courtesy, Political Science
bmkhigh Beatriz Magaloni Senior Fellow Professor, Political Science
edgar franco Edgar Franco Vivanco Doctoral Candidate, Political Science