Governance

Governance

FSI's research on the origins, character and consequences of government institutions spans continents and academic disciplines. The institute’s senior fellows and their colleagues across Stanford examine the principles of public administration and implementation. Their work focuses on how maternal health care is delivered in rural China, how public action can create wealth and eliminate poverty, and why U.S. immigration reform keeps stalling. Looking more broadly at these issues, FSI’s Governance Project works on measuring the quality of governance and assessing a country’s ability to deliver public services.

FSI’s work includes comparative studies of how institutions help resolve policy and societal issues. Scholars aim to clearly define and make sense of the rule of law, examining how it is invoked and applied around the world. One project explores how authoritarian and democratic regimes can encourage or suppress economic development. Meanwhile, the European Governance project looks at governance issues on a single continent.

FSI researchers also investigate government services – trying to understand and measure how they work, whom they serve and how good they are. They assess energy services aimed at helping the poorest people around the world and explore public opinion on torture policies. The Children in Crisis project addresses how child health interventions interact with political reform. Specific research on governance, organizations and security capitalizes on FSI's longstanding interests and looks at how governance and organizational issues affect a nation’s ability to address security and international cooperation.

Recent News

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ARD scholar Elias Muhanna nominated for Next Century Foundation award

February 2012

Program on Arab Reform and Democracy scholar Elias Muhanna, the blogger behind qifanabki.com, has been nominated for a special award for an outstanding contribution to new media by the Next Century...

An opportunity to engage: US public diplomacy and the rise of Islamist parties

January 2012

One year after the Arab Spring, American public diplomacy is still facing the now-established conundrum of linking words and actions.

Stanford scholars reflect on Arab Spring

January 2012

A year after the Egyptian uprising, five scholars talk about democracy in the Middle East, how lives have changed in the Arab world, and what the U.S. has learned from the Arab Spring.

Lebanon, by the Numbers

January 2012

Lebanon’s peculiar brand of democracy, dysfunctional and widely unpopular, is a perennial source of national vexation, debated over Sunday lunches and in the press.

Safadi-Stanford Initiative convenes Washington policymakers

December 2011

On December 6, the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law together with the Safadi Foundation USA inaugurated the Safadi-Stanford...

The kingdom of paradox

November 2011

Visiting Scholar Ahmed Benchemsi discusses the seemingly paradoxic relationship between the independent media and the Moroccan government in two pieces for Harvard's Nieman Reports.

What’s next for Libya after Qaddafi’s death?

October 2011

The killing of Muammar Qadaffi marks an end to one of the most dramatic chapters of the Arab Spring. But what follows after the death of a dictator who has held power for 42 years?

An interview with Prince Moulay Hicham

October 2011

Prince Moulay Hicham ben Abdallah was interviewed in the September/October issue of the French journal Le Débat, providing his unique insight on the Arab Spring events as a member of the Moroccan...

Advancing energy sector reform in Lebanon

September 2011

The Program on Arab Reform and Democracy (ARD) at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, together with the Safadi Foundation USA (SFUSA) and the Center for International Private...

Shaping public diplomacy in the Arab world

August 2011

Lina Khatib head of the Program on Arab Reform at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, examines the role of public diplomacy in the Arab world in two new pieces.

Syrian doctors who torture must be banned

July 2011

In an opinion piece for Al Jazeera, Rajaie Batniji uncovers the role of medical professionals involved in acts of torture.

Morocco's monarchy: Destroying hope for democracy?

June 2011

In anticipation of Morocco's constitutional referendum on July 1, Ahmed Benchemsi argues in a piece for the Guardian that the monarchy's overtures of reform are just a mask for retaining absolute...

Morocco: The king faces the temptation to repress

June 2011

CDDRL consulting professor Hicham Ben Abdallah wrote a new piece for the French daily Libération on the state of the democratic movement in Morocco as it enters a defining period this summer.

Morocco's revolutionaries: the crazy kids have grown up

June 2011

After spending a month in Morocco interviewing leaders of the secular youth movement, CDDRL visiting scholar Ahmed Benchemsi authored an article for Time Magazine to capture his interactions with...

The Arab Spring brings regional experts to Stanford

May 2011

As a new era of democratic change swept across the Arab world this year, the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy (ARD) at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law hosted two...

The solution for Morocco: the reformed monarchy

May 2011

In an interview with the French magazine l’Express, Moulay Hicham Ben Abdallah, a consulting professor at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, analyzes the revolutions in...

Egypt experts convene at Stanford

May 2011

On April 29, the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law hosted a conference to discuss post-revolutionary Egypt.

Political activism conference May 12-13, 2011

April 2011

The Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at CDDRL is pleased to announce its second annual conference, From Political Activism to Democratic Change in the Arab World, to take place on May 12 and 13...

How to Lose Friends and Alienate Your People

March 2011

In a piece for the blog Jadaliyya, Arab Reform and Democracy Program Manager Lina Khatib at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, makes the argument that Arab leaders have...

Moroccan monarchy’s sacredness: an obstacle to democracy

March 2011

In an opinion piece for Le Monde, Ahmed Benchemsi, Visiting Scholar to the Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, discusses the key...

SSIPI partnership launches open call for papers on Lebanon

March 2011

The Program on Arab Reform and Democracy at the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL) at Stanford University, the Safadi Foundation USA (SFUSA), and the Center on...

Diamond provides recommendations for a post-Mubarak world

February 2011

Two decades after the fall of Soviet-bloc dictatorships, popular movements for democracy are erupting in the last regional bastion of authoritarianism: the Arab world.

Tunisia: the house of cards

January 2011

It took just 29 days for President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali to flee Tunisia after mass protests erupted in the country.

Elections and Changing Political Dynamics in the Arab World Seminar Series Launched

September 2010

The Program on Arab Reform and Democracy is pleased to announce its seminar series for 2010-11, titled "Elections and Changing Political Dynamics in the Arab World".