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Teaching – WINTER 2015

Courses offered by CDDRL and taught by CDDRL faculty


This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.

 

Development Economics (ECON 118)

The microeconomic problems and policy concerns of less developed countries. Topics include: health and education; risk and insurance; microfinance; agriculture; technology; governance. Emphasis is on economic models and empirical evidence. Prerequisites: 52, 102B.
 
The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development and human rights. The course is intended for students interested in global health, development studies, or international relations, and provides opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. 
 

Stephen Stedman and Paul Wise

The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development and human rights. The course is intended for students interested in global health, development studies, or international relations, and provides opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. 
 
Interdisciplinary approaches to understanding human-environment interactions with a focus on economics, policy, culture, history, and the role of the state. Prerequisite: ECON 1
 
 

The course integrates historical analysis and economic theory in evaluating the nature and role of institutions in economic and political outcomes. The motivating question is the factors determining economic and political developments in the long run and the historical focus is on the Middle East, Europe, and China over the last millennium. The course first examines various approaches for the study of institutions, their nature and dynamics and then focuses on detailed discussions of frontier research papers.

 

The course integrates historical analysis and economic theory in evaluating the nature and role of institutions in economic and political outcomes. The motivating question is the factors determining economic and political developments in the long run and the historical focus is on the Middle East, Europe, and China over the last millennium. The course first examines various approaches for the study of institutions, their nature and dynamics and then focuses on detailed discussions of frontier research papers.

 

The course integrates historical analysis and economic theory in evaluating the nature and role of institutions in economic and political outcomes. The motivating question is the factors determining economic and political developments in the long run and the historical focus is on the Middle East, Europe, and China over the last millennium. The course first examines various approaches for the study of institutions, their nature and dynamics and then focuses on detailed discussions of frontier research papers.

 

Enrollment limited to graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with consent of instructor only. Introduces research methods for conducting studies involving health in low-income context. Focuses on developing a concept note to support a funding proposal. addressing research question of student's interest. Skills developed include developing a compelling research question; synthesizing a focused literature review; selecting and adapting appropriate study design, target population, sampling methods, data collection and analysis; addressing human subject issues; developing productive cross-collaboration.

 
Focus on understanding the diversity of political, social, and economic outcomes in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Exploration of questions, including: Is Russia still a global power? Where does it have influence internationally, how much, and why? Developmentally, what is the relevant comparison set of countries? Is Russia's economic growth over the last decade truly similar to Brazil, China, and India or is it more comparable to Kazakhstan, Nigeria, and Kenya? How has Russia's domestic political trajectory from liberalizing country to increasingly autocratic affected its foreign policy toward Ukraine, Georgia, and other formerly Soviet states? Finally, is Russia's reemergence as an important global actor more apparent than real?
 

This seminar delves into a comprehensive new volume on food security written by an all-Stanford team of nineteen faculty and researchers. It explores the interconnections of food security with energy, water, climate, health, and national security, and examines the role of food and agricultural policies and their consequences in countries at different stages of development. Led by the editor of the book, with participation of several of the authors from across many disciplines. Prerequisite: ECON 106. Admission is by application.

 
This is a case-based course on how to achieve public policy reform with the aim of promoting private sector development in developing countries. It will deal with issues like privatization, reducing informality, infrastructure development, trade promotion, and combatting corruption.
 

(Same as LAW 782) Many US human rights non-government organizations, including the US philanthropic sector, work on international human rights. The US government also engages with the private sector in "partnerships" that twins US foreign aid human rights action with corporate expertise. This weekly series will feature speakers who lead these human rights NGOs, philanthropic enterprises, and corporate partnerships, and also policy experts and scholars, to explore the pro's and con's of this scenario.

 

 

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